10-7: Patsy Gore retires from Chickasaw 911

 Patsy Gore signed off as 911 Coordinator June 30 after more than 20 years as a dispather and administrator. She is shown with Chickasaw County Chief Deputy James Meyers. (Floyd Ingram / Buy at photos.chickasawjournal.com)


Patsy Gore signed off as 911 Coordinator June 30 after more than 20 years as a dispather and administrator. She is shown with Chickasaw County Chief Deputy James Meyers. (Floyd Ingram / Buy at photos.chickasawjournal.com)

CHICKASAW COUNTY – When Pasty Gore went 10-7 on Monday, it marked 23 years of always being the person people from across the county could call for help.

Gore formally retired as Chickasaw County 911 director June 30 and a community-wide reception will be held at Chickasaw County Regional Correctional Facility from 2-4 p.m. July 7.

“I started work part-time in February 1991 for Sheriff Mack Cook and went to work full-time on Jan. 6, 1992 for Jimmy (Simmons).” said Gore. “I started as a dispatcher and jailer at the old jail on Harrington Street.

“We had one radio,” said Gore. “You looked a lot of things up in books and you had to memorize so much. Now you’ve got it at your fingertips on the computer.”

One of the first things Gore had to memorizes were the police 10-codes. Some are simple: 10-4 means message received, 10-8 means in service and 10-20 is location. To go 10-7 means to no longer be in service.

“There are some things I am going to miss, but there are also parts of the job I don’t like,” said Gore. “I don’t like the stress and it can take up a lot of your time.”

Gore said she is looking forward to retirement and will tend her garden, travel and spoil her grandchildren.

“But I’ll miss the people,” said Gore. “Each one of these officers is just like one of my children. I watched out for them over the years and I’ve watched a lot of them grow up, too.”

Chickasaw County Chief Deputy James Meyers said Gore was always that safe and secure voice on the other end of the radio.

“She was always there for us and always watched out for us,” said Meyers. “She never turned down nothing. She was dedicated, she knew her job and she will be missed.”

Meyers said the public has no idea how dependent law enforcement and emergency crews are on their dispatcher. He pointed out a lone-officer on a traffic stop in the middle of the night or at a domestic disturbance way out in the county only has their dispatcher for backup.

“She was also someone you could come talk to about things more than the job,” said Meyers. “She cares about people.”

Gore said she didn’t want to talk about shooting, stabbings, fights, fires or bank robberies.

“Those things were part of the job,” said Gore. “I do think I helped people in the community. When a person calls a dispatcher, they need help. I always tried to help the best I could.”

Gore was influential in managing the 911 system that was set up in Chickasaw County years ago. She said she took that job even though it made her more of a paper-pusher and administrator rather than someone helping people in the community.

“Dispatching is not easy and has to be done right or people get hurt,” said Gore. “You’ve got to keep up with a thousand details and not get flustered when things start happening.”

Gore said she hopes people will support her successor and not be a hindrance to needs at the 911 Communication Center.

And Gore was trying to help people and her officers to the very end. What does she want from the community?

“Tell people to put a number on their house!” said Gore. “We can’t help you if we can’t find you, and a house number makes our job a whole lot easier.”

 

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