DAR honors Cameron Byrne

Cameron Byrne, center, earned the 2013 DAR Outstanding Work in American History certificate at Houston High School. The award was presented by Betty Atkinson, right, American History Chairman of the Chuquatonchee Chapter of the DAR, and Cathy Spencer, left, Parker's American history teacher. (Photo by Floyd Ingram)

Cameron Byrne, center, earned the 2013 DAR Outstanding Work in American History certificate at Houston High School. The award was presented by Betty Atkinson, right, American History Chairman of the Chuquatonchee Chapter of the DAR, and Cathy Spencer, left, Parker’s American history teacher.
(Photo by Floyd Ingram)

HOUSTON — The Chuquatonchee Chapter of the DAR has awarded Cameron Byrne, its top honor for her grades in history at Houston High School.

Byrne earned the chapter’s Outstanding Work in American History Award with a 98.7 grade in the class.

“We are always so proud to recognize those students who excel in history,” said Betty Atkinson, DAR American History chairman. “Cameron’s grade reflects a lot of hard work and the local chapter of the DAR is always pleased to honor that effort.”

Parker’s American history teacher, Cathy Spencer, said the Byrne has excelled in history because she likes it.

“She is one of the best history students I have had in years and I’ve been teaching for 21 years,” said Spencer. “Cameron is a deep thinker and she applies history to current events and sees how it all works together.”

Byrne said world history is her favorite and she has traveled to Greece, Italy, France, Turkey and Mexico. She said she enjoys taking what she has learned in books and seeing it in reality.

“I have always enjoyed history, especially world history,” said Byrne. “It’s interesting to read about how things came about, but when you get to go there and see those places, it makes it special.”

Byrne pointed out technology and commerce makes the world smaller every day. She said the influence of different countries and cultures is all around us.
“I find it interesting to see how every country influences other countries,” said Byrne. “Finding those links makes history so much more fun and personal.”

Byrne, a junior, said she has not made up her mind on a college but would like to attend Notre Dame. She said she had not picked a major.

“I like accounting and my dad is an accountant,” said Byrne. “We’ll see where things go.

Byrne is the daughter of Tom and Carol Byrne and a member of both the First United Methodist Church and Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church in Houston.

She is a member of both Anchor and Beta clubs at Houston High School. She is also part of the Houston cross country track team and tennis team. She is also a member of the Topper Pride Band and likes to read in her spare time.

The DAR, founded in 1890 and headquartered in Washington, D.C., is a non-profit, non-political volunteer women’s service organization dedicated to promoting patriotism, preserving American history and securing America’s future through better education for children.

DAR members volunteer more than 60,000 hours annually to veteran patients, award over $150,000 in scholarships and financial aid each year to students and support schools for the underprivileged with annual donations exceeding one million dollars.

As one of the most inclusive genealogical societies in the country, DAR boasts 165,000 members in 3,000 chapters across the United States and internationally. Any woman 18 years or older – regardless of race, religion, or ethnic background – who can prove lineal descent from a patriot of the American Revolution, is eligible for membership.

The Chuquatonchee Chapter, Mississippi State Society, of the Daughter’s of the American Revolution is headquartered in Houston.

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